Posts Tagged ‘Dog protection’

Albert Schweitzer says…

Hear our prayer O Lord … for animals that are overworked, underfed, and cruelly treated; for all wistful creatures in captivity that beat their wings against bars; for any that are hunted or lost or deserted or frightened or hungry; for all that must be put to death…. and for those who deal with them we ask a heart of compassion and gentle hands and kindly words. Make us, ourselves, to be true friends to animals, and so to share the blessings of the merciful.
~ Albert Schweitzer ~

My Life with Dogs #19

”Friends: As you read along you will quickly come to realize that I am of the old school in training dogs. Or maybe, if you have been to any training schools in the past five years, reading my method will be ‘new’ to you. I’ll talk about the differences later, but for now, again, welcome! If you have time, reading my former blogs will bring you up to date.
The basis of my training method falls into five categories, or lessons…sit back and enjoy.” John

“Outside of a dog, a book is probably man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.” Groucho Marx

There are parts of the human body that wear out sooner than others. For me it was the left, inguinal hernia…a piece of the anatomy that screams for relief when you are training dogs…especially dogs that could care less about your pain and suffering.

     My hernia came about when I was lifting used railroad cross ties into holes for a horse paddock on our farm. When I felt and heard the internal “snap” I knew my body was telling me I had screwed up.

     At the time, I belonged to a civic group called Ruritan, most members were farmers, and most had endured hernias. Now, if you know anything about farmers, then you know they are the ultimate businessmen. They have to know market conditions for their various crops, they have to be able to budget, they have to be weathermen, accountants and contractors…and generally, they are their own workforce. Point being, they can’t afford to be laid up in a hospital when there’s work to be done on the farm. Which brings me to my next point, they also know about medicine.

     Once my Ruritan friends found out about my hernia there was only one place to go, Shouldice Hospital in Ontario, Canada. Why Shouldice? That’s where a unique technique was developed so that the recurrence factor of the hernia was near .05 percent as opposed to 15 percent in the United States. And farmers could be back on the tractor within 48 hours. A win-win as far as the farmers were concerned. They loved Shouldice, as did my insurance company, but my Mom thought I was nuts.

     I tell you this because my hernia burst forth in the middle of my first set of dog training classes in Hartville. And by the time my second set of classes was scheduled, I had airline tickets to Canada and was scheduled for an operation.
Remember the dog biting preamble I mentioned above…

     On the night before I was to leave for Canada, I held a first-night training class. Lo and behold a lady approached me with a German Shepherd. I made the mistake of not studying the dog before I agreed to hold him while she returned to her car for her purse.

     I took the leash, she turned, I turned my attention from the dog to answer the question of another handler, and her dog bit me on the left cheek of my rear end, opening up a five-inch gash that gushed blood like a stuck pig. And to increase my embarrassment, he also took a five-inch square of my pants with him.

     Talk about attention getters!

     Within a second the dog lunged for me again, but this time I was ready. For the next five minutes I worked that dog on leash to the point we were both sweating like Arabian Knights. When I finished he sat at my side, perfectly still, not willing to bite ever again…at least not me! I will admit, there are some very special training techniques I use for dogs that bite humans…but we all have our secrets…right?

    Remember:  I am responsible for the safety of all dogs and handlers in my classes. When I am aware of a problem dog, I can keep that dog and handler separate from the rest of the class until appropriate training has been completed and I am satisfied that they are ready to join the others.

     An indiscriminate biter, fear biter, aggressive biter, or any other type of biter is a menace to society. In the majority of court cases the person owning the dog that bites is judged as the guilty party.

     Numerous times through the years folks have tried to justify the threat of their dog. It’s different if your wife is being attacked and your dog comes to the rescue. Everyone would support your dog. But, dogs that bite kids, mailmen. meter-readers, other dogs and cats, surprise guests, the extended hand of a vet, or any other person without provocation, as I said, are a menace to society. These dogs should be trained or placed in a home where the owner is totally knowledgeable of the problem. AND, if you choose a training class, then for goodness sake keep your dog in the car or separated from other dogs and people until you have talked with the trainer.

My trip to Canada was painful. Upon arrival I discussed my difficulty with the nursing staff who immediately prepared a Seitz bath to calm my raging sore, which could not be stitched because dog bite wounds need to drain.

     Two days later, finding it uncomfortable to sit or lay, I returned to Hartville with ten-feet of stainless steel wire supporting my hernia, and resolve to err on the side of caution the next time a handler asked me to hold a dog while they get their purse. I’ve decided it isn’t worth the $30 training fee.

Prayer in memory of a pet

Friends:  I can not count the number of pets I have outlived.  Hopefully, though, the day will come that I will meet each of them again.  If you feel the same this prayer is for you. 

Prayer in Memory of a Pet
Almighty God,
I was fortunate to receive the gift of (pet name) from You
Now that he (she) has left this life,
please help me cope with my loss with strength and courage.
I know that my beloved companion no longer suffers,
and will live on in many fond memories.
May they be treated with the care and respect
As he (she) has enriched my life,
I pray that I may enrich the lives of others. Amen.
Basilica and Shrine of Our Lady of Consolation.

Prayer for a lost pet

Friends: 

So many of us have to deal with the heartache of a lost pet.  I hope to following will help you turn the right corner when you are calling his name. John

Prayer for a lost pet

Father
We ask you to help us find ________,
our dear pet who is now lost.
We know that you
placed animals on the earth
for many reasons,
including companionship for man.
We therefore ask you
to help us find our lost companion,
and pray that You will keep him (her) safe
and protect him (her) from harm until he (she) is found.
We join our prayers with St. Francis,
St. Anthony, and all the saints,
and pray in the name of Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen
David Bennettpraying

My Life with Dogs #18

“Friends: I don’t know if you have been reading my blogs about My Life With Dogs…or if you might be “jumping in” with this being your first exposure. If so, WELCOME, you are hitting the right time as this is where I begin to talk about my training technique, known as The Famed Method of Dog Training.
As you read along you will quickly come to realize that I am of the old school in training dogs. Or maybe, if you have been to any training schools in the past five years, reading my method will be ‘new’ to you. I’ll talk about the differences later, but for now, again, welcome! If you have time, reading my former blogs will bring you up to date.
The basis of my training method falls into five categories, or lessons…sit back and enjoy.” John

Lesson number one: You must first get your dog’s attention.

     With that said I let Dodger lunge for Tagore while at the same time I take off in the opposite direction with the lead held firmly in hand. Timing has to be perfect for this training exercise to work. On this particular day, Dodger was airborne in his attempt to grapple with Tagore. Then the lead tightened and jerked his body back towards me. At times this movement elicits a yelp of surprise from my “victim.” In a friendly voice I called to him. He came. I patted him on the head, told him to stay, and dropped the leash. He didn’t move and I had everyone’s attention.

“When is obedience needed,” I ask again.

“During time of distraction,” I answer my own question…but this time everyone knows exactly what I am talking about. This is a wonderful training exercise and you too can use it as an effective measure to get your dogs’ attention. If, when walking your dog, he begins to drift from your side, turn and take four or five driving steps in the opposite direction. Do this every time his attention drifts. You’ll see a dramatic change in control. Before long he will be standing or sitting at your side ready to anticipate your next move…and you’ll begin to look forward to walks in the park with him.

Through the years my three kids have enjoyed wagering as to how long it would take me to get control of an unmanageable dog. Never has it taken me more than 45 seconds. And in every case the mutt in question would end up at my side, watching me intently, his tail wagging with anticipation.  No treats needed!!!

Please remember this; it is important to the extent that it will be noted more than once in this book: Firm corrections will solve problems quicker than feeble ones. Further, they are more humane, more impressionable, and place you where you belong…in the position of unquestioned and substantial authority.  I must tell you, there is no place for political correctness in training a dog the stop from pulling his master around the block every time they go for a leisurely stroll in the park.  I see it all the time in my small town and the look on the faces of the masters is always embarrassment, as if he is saying, “what am I supposed to do?”

Note: When it comes to obedience training, your dog has three levels of awareness:

Level 1) all disruption and distraction fights for his attention. Squirrels in the park, other dogs, kids on bikes, airborne Frisbees. His awareness of new and unusual happenings bombards his psych and he tries to watch everything going on around him. You are lucky if you are one of those distractions.

     Level 2) disruptions and distractions around him are a cue for him to pay attention to you. This awareness kicks in about the third week of obedience training. We want him to view all aspects of a convoluted world in regards to you, his master…when on, or eventually off, lead.

     Level 3) the absence of disruption or distraction (you are waking in the park and nothing is going on) is the cue for him to watch you. This is the ultimate awareness we seek through obedience training.

Here’s an example of the difference between level 1 and level 3. You’ve seen it many times when you go for a walk in the park.

Level 1: The dog is at the end of the lead, lunging at passersby, squirrels, and joggers; totally oblivious to his master’s every pleading.

Level 3: The dog walks at the heel position beside his master…off lead…keeping an eye on his master’s every move while also aware of the world around him. Or, you see a dog running loose in the city park, but you note that he is constantly looking back towards something. He sees a squirrel, but then looks back; he tracks a scent; but then looks back. And then you hear a faint whistle and the dog makes a bee line to his master who has been walking 50-yards behind.

NEXT

WHAT I’VE LEARNED: Mr. Tuck, by the way, had taught me one of the preambles of dog handling. “It’s not how often you will get bitten, its how bad”…and my time was on the horizon.

Prayer for Pets #2

Prayer for a Sick Pet

Heavenly Father,
Please help us in our time of need,
You have made us stewards of (name of pet).
If it is Your will, please restore him (her)
to health and strength.
I pray too for other animals in need.
May they be treated with the care and respect
deserving of all Your creation.
Blessed are You Lord God,
and holy is Your name for ever and ever
Basilica and Shrine of Our Lady of Consolation.

Prayer for pets #1

Recently, a friend asked me to say a prayer that she would find her lost dog. That got me to thinking about the spiritual place that animals hold in our lives. My research led me to eight specific prayers that I am going to pass to you over the next two weeks. I hope these prayers lead you to inner peace as you struggle with sickness, loss and memory of your beloved pet.

A Pet Blessing

Dearest God, Heavenly Father
maker of all living creatures,
we ask you to bless (name of pet),
who brings so much joy into our lives.
By the power of Your love,
enable him (her) to live according to your plan.
May we always praise You for all Your beauty in creation.
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
Blessed are You, God, in all Your creatures!
Basilica and Shrine of Our Lady of Consolation.

Dog Speak

Do dogs talk?

Yes, they communicate in hundreds of ways…but do they talk?

Here’s my daughter’s lab answering the question…

http://youtu.be/kAo0_xUAm3Q photo(44)

My Life With Dogs #17

“Friends: I don’t know if you have been reading my blogs about My Life With Dogs…or if you might be “jumping in” with this being your first exposure. If so, WELCOME, you are hitting the right time as this is where I begin to talk about my training technique, known as The Famed Method of Dog Training.
As you read along you will quickly come to realize that I am of the old school in training dogs. Or maybe, if you have been to any training schools in the past five years, reading my method will be ‘new’ to you. I’ll talk about the differences later, but for now, again, welcome! If you have time, reading my former blogs will bring you up to date.
The basis of my training method falls into five categories, or lessons…you’re just one chapter away from the first. Thanks for reading.” John

Have you seen this picture? A person is walking their dog on the street. The dog is at the end of the lead lunging like a plow-horse tilling the south forty or a Husky mushing at the Iditarod. His breathing is raspy as the choker digs into his throat. The dog knows his master is back there somewhere because he can feel him restraining his freedom. It is the dog who decides where this “walk” is headed.

Meanwhile, the master, who planned taking a leisurely stroll in the park, is gasping for air, his arms are nothing but an extension of the leash, he is literally being dragged along, and if you dare get close enough, you can hear him desperately whispering, over and over, “whoa, boy, whoa, boy, whoa, boy!” It is not, I assure you, a moment of bonding between the two.
This scenario leads to the next training exercise: getting control and the attention of your dog.

By the way: Pulling or lunging on lead, and a dog’s insatiable desire to run away, is simply a response to his instinct for freedom. Most dogs have a natural impulse to flee any type of enclosure, whether it’s a fence, leash, or garage.

I can whistle pretty loud. Loud enough that even the dogs stop acting up…at least momentarily.
“When is obedience needed?’’ I query. There are no takers. Everyone sees Tagore sitting at my side, not the least interested in all the crazies surrounding him.

“During time of distraction.” I answer my own question. golden (2)

I give him a simple hand signal meaning that he should stay in place and I walk away from him. I walk directly towards the “hardened case” that will be my attention getter and ask the owner for permission to take the leash. I ask the dog’s name.
I move back toward the center of the yard, but not too close to Tagore.

Meanwhile, Dodger, a 75-pound male Rottweiler figures he’ll play havoc with me. He lunges, runs in circles, tries to wrap me in his leash, and barks incessantly.

“In order for me to teach you anything, I have to have your attention. Conversely, in order for you to teach your dog anything, you’ve got to have his.” I give that a second to sink in. “Obviously,” I say, “I’ve got your attention because you’re wondering what I’m going to do to get Dodger’s attention. Right?”

     Everyone nods.

My Life With Dogs #16

Friends: I have decided to share with you My Life With Dogs. These Blogs taken from my book, 14000 Dogs Later, may be one page at a time, or more. I don’t want to dump too much on you at a time. I hope you enjoy. Feel free to make comments here, or on Face Book or Twitter.
ALERT…ALERT…ALERT
Note: There has come upon us a new day in the sport or activity of training dogs. Where baiting dogs used to be reserved for the conformation ring…today it has taken over the obedience ring as well. In a future blog I will proffer to you my opinions of using treats as opposed to the forced method of training…and I will extend my discussion far beyond the enclosue of an obedience ring or a walk in the park…I will talk with you about the training methods of guard, attack, protection, seeing eye, scent, rescue and much more. In the meantime, no matter your choice of training, please attempt to appreciate the following.

“Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.” Roger Caras

     Following my military stint I returned to West Virginia where my old dog, Chad, became my sidekick as if I had never left home. My concentration on training dogs slid into the background while I finished my undergraduate degree at Marshall University and found Emma Sue Kincaid who reluctantly agreed to marry me. (The previous two girls had both said absolutely not!) We got married and laid plans for working in Northeastern Ohio.

I received a call from Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company in Akron, Ohio, interviewed, and became Associate Sales Manager of Sales Publications. Emma Sue and I rented an apartment in Canton while she found a position in the Canton South School system teaching in Special Education. Chad was our constant companion, a steadying force in our new life, and we took him to the city park every night for ball throwing and long walks.dog training and obedience_r (2)

It was there we met Stephanie and Jeff Martin, who owned a beautiful Doberman Pincher puppy…we were hooked. They introduced us to Mollie and Joe Israel who owed a Dobbie champion named Omar. Within a month we had our own Doberman pup that we named Tagore…and all of a sudden I found myself back in the groove of training dogs. While I was training Tagore I also helped Steph and Jeff with their pup. We’d meet at the city park each night after work and before long strangers started appearing with their pups and all of a sudden I was teaching classes again.

In mid-1969 I received a call from Kent State University from Jim Turner. He wanted to interview me for a position as Associate Director of Radio-TV Information. I liked the opportunity, left Goodyear, and Emma Sue and I moved to Hartville, a small Amish farming community on Route 43 halfway between the university where I would work and Canton South, where Emma Sue worked.

Our eleven acres was surrounded by big-time farmers. On one side was Jo Bixler, who later became my first daughter’s godfather. He farmed 400 acres with the most modern equipment. Across the road was the Amish bishop, Mr. Byler, who had ten daughters. Those girls could sling a 60-pound bale of hay further than any man. My Byler tilled and planted with beautiful Belgian workhorses. Two diverse farmers, with equally diverse farming equipment…yet when the corn was high both fields looked lush and plentiful.

I remember telling Emma Sue my dog training days would probably be over, after all who would drive 15 miles from Kent or Canton, or 20 miles from Akron to attend classes on a small farm in Hartville. But I gave it a shot anyway. I ran an advertisement in papers in Hartville, Canton, and Kent.

We had an acre of flat land as a front yard and every inch of it was filled with cars, people and dogs on our first night of class. I had learned from previous travesties to keep all dogs at least ten feet apart and I personally announced this as each individual exited their car while Emma Sue handled signups.

Friends: I have decided to share with you My Life With Dogs. These Blogs taken from my book, 14000 Dogs Later, may be one page at a time, or more. I don’t want to dump too much on you at a time. I hope you enjoy. Feel free to make comments here, or on Face Book or Twitter.
ALERT…ALERT…ALERT
Note: There has come upon us a new day in the sport or activity of training dogs. Where baiting dogs used to be reserved for the conformation ring…today it has taken over the obedience ring as well. In a future blog I will proffer to you my opinions of using treats as opposed to the forced method of training…and I will extend my discussion far beyond the enclosue of an obedience ring or a walk in the park…I will talk with you about the training methods of guard, attack, protection, seeing eye, scent, rescue and much more. In the meantime, not matter your choice of training, please attempt to appreciate the following.
“Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.” Roger Caras

F
ollowing my military stint I returned to West Virginia where my old dog, Chad, became my sidekick as if I had never left home. My concentration on training dogs slid into the background while I finished my undergraduate degree at Marshall University and found Emma Sue Kincaid who reluctantly agreed to marry me. (The previous two girls had both said absolutely not!) We got married and laid plans for working in Northeastern Ohio.
I received a call from Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company in Akron, Ohio, interviewed, and became Associate Sales Manager of Sales Publications. Emma Sue and I rented an apartment in Canton while she found a position in the Canton South School system teaching in Special Education. Chad was our constant companion, a steadying force in our new life, and we took him to the city park every night for ball throwing and long walks.
It was there we met Stephanie and Jeff Martin, who owned a beautiful Doberman Pincher puppy…we were hooked. They introduced us to Mollie and Joe Israel who owed a Dobbie champion named Omar. Within a month we had our own Doberman pup that we named Tagore…and all of a sudden I found myself back in the groove of training dogs. While I was training Tagore I also helped Steph and Jeff with their pup. We’d meet at the city park each night after work and before long strangers started appearing with their pups and all of a sudden I was teaching classes again.
In mid-1969 I received a call from Kent State University from Jim Turner. He wanted to interview me for a position as Associate Director of Radio-TV Information. I liked the opportunity, left Goodyear, and Emma Sue and I moved to Hartville, a small Amish farming community on Route 43 halfway between the university where I would work and Canton South, where Emma Sue worked.
Our eleven acres was surrounded by big-time farmers. On one side was Jo Bixler, who later became my first daughter’s godfather. He farmed 400 acres with the most modern equipment. Across the road was the Amish bishop, Mr. Byler, who had ten daughters. Those girls could sling a 60-pound bale of hay further than any man. My Byler tilled and planted with beautiful Belgian workhorses. Two diverse farmers, with equally diverse farming equipment…yet when the corn was high both fields looked lush and plentiful.
I remember telling Emma Sue my dog training days would probably be over, after all who would drive 15 miles from Kent or Canton, or 20 miles from Akron to attend classes on a small farm in Hartville. But I gave it a shot anyway. I ran an advertisement in papers in Hartville, Canton, and Kent.
We had an acre of flat land as a front yard and every inch of it was filled with cars, people and dogs on our first night of class. I had learned from previous travesties to keep all dogs at least ten feet apart and I personally announced this as each individual exited their car while Emma Sue handled signups. I had also learned that having people’s attention is absolutely critical on the first night of training. So while everyone stood around feigning control of their dog, I looked for the most rowdy mutt in the bunch. There’s always plenty to choose from; pulling at the leash, lunging at other people and dogs, incessant barking. I’d pick the most hardened case…that dog would d be my unsuspecting attention-getter.

I had also learned that having people’s attention is absolutely critical on the first night of training. So while everyone stood around feigning control of their dog, I looked for the most rowdy mutt in the bunch. There’s always plenty to choose from; pulling at the leash, lunging at other people and dogs, incessant barking. I’d pick the most hardened case…that dog would be my unsuspecting attention-getter.