Archive for December, 2010

WV State Police K-9 Director

“IN 14,000 DOGS LATER, JOHN SMITH GETS IT RIGHT FROM THE BEGINNING TO THE END. NOT ONLY IS IT AN OUTSTANDING READ, BUT HE PROVIDES A GUIDE FOR PEOPLE TO GET PAST, AND PREVENT PROBLEMS, AND ULTIMATELY ENJOY THEIR DOG MORE. HE DOES THIS IN A VERY ENTERTAINING WAY THAT MAKES THE READER FEEL LIKE PART OF THE EXPERIENCE. I HAVE TRAINED POLICE DOGS FOR A NUMBER OF YEARS AND MUST SAY THAT IF I HAD A PROBLEM WITH MY PET DOG IT IS JOHNS’ ADVICE AND WISDOM I WOULD SEEK”. RON ARTHUR WV STATE POLICE K-9 DIRECTOR.
www.14000dogslater.com

Truth or Myth?

Truth or myth:  Dogs should have a litter before they are spayed.  Not true.  Veterinarians tell me that there is a lower risk of cancer and infections in spayed dogs.  In fact, dogs spayed prior to their first heat cycle have a 95 per cent reduced risk of breast cancer compared to sexually intact females. WOOF!

MYSTERY SOLVED!

Our Mystery remains just that…but he is our Mystery.  Home tonight from the vet, who pronounced him disease free and recovering from being malnourshed, dehydrated, starving, and lonely.   Mystery is no longer at death’s door…rather he will now find his place in the barn amongst two cats, two dogs, and five horses.  His youth has passed and we know nothing of his past days, but his future, as long as he wishes to stay with us, is secure.  No doubt if this cat could speak his words would be ten, “Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night.”

Mystery at Christmas

Mystery arrived seven days before Christmas.  One of those unexpected surprises of life that is difficult to figure.  A puzzle with missing pieces.  A happenstance that defies explanation.  Margaret found her curled in a bale of hay…weak, neglected, old, underweight, dehydrated, and gasping for air because of a twisted flea collar.  We fed her a few morsels of cat food, offered water sparingly until, satisfied, ignoring the interest of the other cats and dogs, she found her place in the hay and slept.  On the sixth day before Christmas she was obviously on the rebound.  Though merely more than skin and bone, she purred at the touch, and languished in our arms.  We guessed her to be eight to nine years of age, slump shouldered: her steps are of labor, and her fangs are longer than any I have seen.  I wanted to call her Wolf.  She is Mystery though, because we do not know from whence she came.  But, we do know WHY she came.  See did not want to die alone.  And so we have taken her in.  On the fifth day before Christmas, today, Margaret took her to the veterinarian where tests will determine her future.  I will tell you those results tomorrow.  No matter the decision though, one of the Mystery’s of the Christmas season, when we all find ways to extend our arms to one another, be it our human or animal friends, has once again manifested itself.  John

Michael Vick wants a dog!

According to the New York Daily News, the Philadelphia Eagles quarterback told reporters, “I would love to have another dog. My entire life I grew up with a pet in my house. The last few years were the first that I haven’t had one. My daughter is used to it, my son is used to it. It’s just different. I feel bad for them and the entire situation, what I did. It could be part of my rehabilitation process showing people I do care about animals sincerely and genuinely.”
WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS????  WOLF!

Winter Weather Repeat

I apologize for repeating the following, especially since I just posted this recently.  But, considering the present and coming temperatures, it remains as important as ever…so here goes:  Words of caution regarding winter weather.  Short-haired dogs have little protection against wind and low temperatures. They ought not be left out unattended. Double-coated dogs should have access to a dog house with an opening opposite the wind. A small enclosure allows a dog to better trap body heat. The opening should have a burlap flap or other covering. Watch for frozen water in bowl.  Better still, on blustery nights bring your dog in the house or garage. WOOF!

Neutral Territory

I receive this same question multiple times a year.   “I’m going to visit my friend and I’m taking my dog.  When we turn them loose together in the yard what should we do if they…growl, bite, fight, etc.”  My answer is always the same.  Introduce them on neutral territory.  Basically, neutral territory is anywhere other than the property of the home-dog, where he feels a need to protect his property by a show of dominance.   True, there’s less concern when it’s a male-female introduction.  Still, if it takes a little extra time to let them meet…on lead…at the dog park, at the mall, on that vacant piece of property about a mile across town, it is well worth the effort.  Then, when you take them to the back yard…still on lead…of the home-dog and give them another 5-minute re-introduction before turning them loose to romp, you’ll have had every indication as to whether problems are going to occur.  How will you know  if trouble is on the horizon.  Watch the tail, ears, hackles, curled lips, low growl, stand-offish attitude.  You’ll know.  I promise.  Remember the old addage…stop, look, listen and heed!  WOOF!